Carleton Place & District Memorial Hospital, celebrating with the Ottawa Heart Institute: 10 years of offering smoking cessation support to patients!

CARLETON PLACE, October 21, 2016 — Carleton Place & District Memorial Hospital (CPDMH) is celebrating ten years of partnership with the Ottawa Heart Institute’s Ottawa Model for Smoking Cessation (OMSC). Since implementation of the OMSC at CPDMH, nearly 400 smokers have been reached through personalized, best practice tobacco dependence treatment, resulting in increased quit attempts and long-term cessation. Approximately 120 smokers are smoke-free as a result of the support they received while at CPDMH.

In 2002, smoking cessation experts at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute developed the Ottawa Model for Smoking Cessation–an institutional program that systematically identifies, provides treatment, and offers follow-up to patients who smoke as part of routine care. In 2006, UOHI began to assist other inpatient, outpatient and primary care settings to implement the OMSC. Implementation of the OMSC led to an absolute 11% increase in long-term quit rates among hospitalized patients (from 18% to 29% at 6 months). In eastern Ontario, nearly 100,000 smokers have been assisted through Ottawa Model programs, leading to approximately 25,000 people becoming smoke-free.

“Implementing the Ottawa Model at CPDMH has provided a great resource for our patient who smoke,” said Laurie Scissons, Manager, Inpatient Nursing. “We have the tools and systems in place to support smokers when they are admitted to the hospital and throughout their stay. Most importantly, our program has contributed to a significant decrease in the number of smokers in our community.”

“This is a great initiative and we are pleased to partner with the University of Ottawa Heart Institute to ensure our patients have the best support possible. It’s a wonderful example of collaboration,” added Mary Wilson Trider, President and CEO, CPDMH.

“The success behind the Ottawa Model for Smoking cessation is truly found in the determined teams across Canada, like here in Carleton Place, that are providing personalized support to smokers who are trying to quit,” said Dr. Andrew Pipe, co-developer of the OMSC and Chief of the Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. “As all hospital grounds in Ontario will be required to be smoke-free by January 2018, helping patients deal with nicotine withdrawal when they are admitted and stay smoke-free when they leave will remain an important priority for hospitals in our region.”

About Carleton Place & District Memorial Hospital

For more than 60 years, Carleton Place & District Memorial Hospital (CPDMH) has been caring for the residents of Carleton Place, Beckwith and surrounding communities. CPDMH provides 24/7 emergency services, more than 60 ambulatory care clinics which include telemedicine, an operating suite and primarily day surgeries. Core services are complemented by physiotherapy, diagnostic imaging and laboratory services. CPDMH received full accreditation with exemplary standing from Accreditation Canada in 2016. The hospital has also been recognized for its efficiency and high patient satisfaction. Recently, CPDMH partnered with Almonte General Hospital to create the Mississippi River Health Alliance to look for more collaborative opportunities and improve access to quality care. Together, we are providing a stronger voice and vision for local health care – close to home.

About the University of Ottawa Heart Institute

The University of Ottawa Heart Institute is Canada’s largest and foremost heart health centre dedicated to understanding, treating and preventing heart disease. UOHI delivers high-tech care with a personal touch, shapes the way cardiovascular medicine is practiced and revolutionizes cardiac treatment and understanding. It builds knowledge through research and translates discoveries into advanced care. UOHI serves the local, national and international community, and is pioneering a new era in heart health

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