2013-10-21

As reported in previous posts (here and here), Christie’s Magnificent Jewels sale in Geneva is full of jaw-dropping jewelry with record-breaking potential.  The long list of sale highlights begins with a bang with The Orange, a 14.82-carat diamond ripe with vivid orange color (lot 286 – est. $17.8 to $21.1 million).

While the excitement of this stone will be hard to beat, other jewels that are sure to cause a bidding frenzy include the three Patiño jewels, the jewels from the collection of Hélène Rochas, HRH Princess Faiza of Egypt’s stunning Art Deco necklace by Van Cleef & Arpels, a dazzling Cartier Art Deco sautoir, three jewels by JAR, the Duchess of Marlborough’s famous amethyst and diamond sautoir/belt, and many more important pieces and precious gemstones.  With that said, let’s get straight to it, shall we?

Here are my favorite lots from the sale:

Lot 286 – THE ORANGE: THE LARGEST FANCY VIVID ORANGE DIAMOND IN THE WORLD

Estimate:  $17,783,896 – $21,118,377



Lot 286 – THE ORANGE: THE LARGEST FANCY VIVID ORANGE DIAMOND IN THE WORLD

The fancy vivid orange pear-shaped diamond weighing approximately 14.82 carats
Accompanied by report no. 16319474 dated 17 August 2013 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is Fancy Vivid Orange colour, VS1 clarity, and a Diamond Type Classification letter indicating that the diamond is Type IA

Also with a Supplemental Letter from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that ‘According to the records of the GIA Laboratory (this diamond) is the largest Fancy Vivid Orange, Natural Colour, diamond graded as of the date of the report issued.’ 

Lot Notes

Pure orange diamonds, also named ‘Fire diamonds’ by famous gemologist Edwin Streeter in his book The Great Diamonds of the World (1882), are exceptionally rare in nature. So few have been graded in the world that the origin of their colour still bears a part of mystery. The present diamond is the the largest Fancy Vivid Orange diamond graded by the GIA Gemological Institute of America to date: ‘In the Laboratory’s experience, strongly coloured diamonds in the orange hue range rarely exceed three of four carats in size when polished. (This diamond) is almost four times larger than that size range. In GIA’s coloured diamond grading system, as the colour appearance of strongly coloured diamonds transitions from orangy yellow to orange the occurrence becomes progressively more rare -that is- the less yellow present the more rarely they occur. These diamonds have been compared with the best sapphire from Sri Lanka as it is unusual for orange diamonds to reach such high levels of saturation.’

The appearance of such a gem at auction is so scarce that amongst the very few fancy vivid orange diamonds that were ever sold at auction, the largest was less than 6 carats, making the ORANGE diamond, weighing as much as 14.82 carat, the ultimate possession for diamond collectors.

 

Lot 209 – AN ART DECO EMERALD AND DIAMOND NECKLACE, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Estimate:  $2,778,734 – $3,890,227



Lot 209 – AN ART DECO EMERALD AND DIAMOND NECKLACE, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

The baguette-cut and epaulet-shaped diamond neckchain enhanced by pavé-set diamond scalopped links, suspending at the front a fringe of nine graduated drop-shaped emeralds with baguette-cut diamond line surmounts, alternated with rectangular-cut diamond collets, to the pendant clasp with drop-shaped emerald terminal, 1929, inner circumference 34.5 cm, with French assay mark for platinum, in beige suede fitted case bearing the khedivial crown and the monogram F

By Van Cleef & Arpels, no. 46.377
Accompanied by report no. 68689 dated 11 June 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the 10 emeralds are of Colombian origin, with indications of moderate amount of oil

Certificate of authenticity dated 18 September 2013 from Van Cleef & Arpels stating that the necklace was created in 1929 and modified in 1937.



Lot Notes

The Court of Egypt

When you look at the pictures of the Egyptian court, 60 or even 70 years ago, it is very hard to imagine that such a refined world ever existed. All the princesses and the ladies who smile on these photographs seem to belong to a fairy tale land which vanished centuries ago. In fact all of this is rather close to our time and some witnesses are still alive.

The beauty of King Farouk’s sisters was truly breathtaking. Thanks to them and their ladies in waiting, parties at the Abdine Palace in Cairo or at the Montazah Palace in Alexandria were always an amazing show of elegance and grace. Princess Faiza’s emerald and diamond necklace is a very rare souvenir of that time. After the 1952 revolution and the exile of the royal family, many of their jewels were sold and dismounted.

Princess Faiza Faud of Egypt and Iran
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

This one is still intact. Maybe its survival has something to do with the extraordinary taste of the woman who bought it in 1947 at Van Cleef & Arpels in Paris. As one member of the Egyptian royal family recently told me: ‘All my aunts were beautiful. Aunt Fawzia (The Shah of Iran first wife who died in Egypt only a few months ago) was the most beautiful of them. But aunt Faiza had something more than beauty. She had an amazing charm. Last time I saw her, a few years before she died, she was almost 70, but when she entered a room everybody would turn around and look at her in admiration.’

Born at Abdine Palace on November the 8th of 1923, Princess Faiza was the most attractive of King Farouk’s five sisters. In 1945, she decided to marry a distant Turkish cousin, Mohamed Ali Bulent Raouf. It is often said that King Farouk was not very pleased by this wedding as he would have much preferred his sister to marry a foreign prince. Princess Faiza was very lively, witty, and she had a wonderful taste for clothes and jewels. She was a regular customer of the Parisian couture houses, especially Chanel. As far as jewellery was concerned, Van Cleef & Arpels was definitely her favorite house.

One of the most famous jewels ever made by Van Cleef & Arpels is the double ‘Clip Pivoine’, two peonies flowers, set in the famous ‘Serti Mysterieux’ for which Van Cleef & Arpels is so famous, are joined together with diamond leaves. The craftsmanship of that piece is so unique that it seems the petals would move if you blow on them. That double clip was also part of Princess Faiza’s collection. She sold the two brooches separately a few years before she died in 1994. Fortunately one of them now belongs to the Van Cleef & Arpels antique jewellery collection. The fate of the second flower remains a mystery.

The emerald and diamond necklace which is offered here demonstrates the same taste. The craftsmanship is perfect. The emerald drops hang from the diamond motives set in a very pure Art Deco style. The necklace is imposing, which is normal as it was worn by Princess Faiza as a ‘Court Jewel’, yet it is very graceful and the stones move very gently on the ‘décolleté’ of the woman who wears the piece.

Princess Faiza could also be a bit provocative in her opinions. In 1952, a few months before the Egyptian revolution, she and her husband launched privately a homemade film about a military coup, which is exactly what happened in July 1952. After the revolution, Princess Faiza and her husband spent a few years in Europe. Upon their divorce, the Princess decided to move to California where she lived with her mother, Queen Nazli and her sister, Princess Fathia. She found a new life there. And there she remained until the end of her life in 1994. She never went back to Egypt.

It is one of the privileges of jewellery to give some kind of immortality to its owner. And the discovery of this truly amazing piece of jewellery, which could have been lost forever, brings back to our minds the delicate memory of a most elegant, gracious and beautiful woman : HRH Princess Faiza of Egypt.

And it is exactly as it should be.

Vincent Meylan

Princess Faiza was the second daughter of King Fouad I of Egypt (1868-1936) and his second wife, Queen Nazli(1894-1978). From his first wedding to princess Shivekiar (1876-1947), King Fouad I had one daughter: Princess Fawkia (1897-1974). From the second one, he had one son, King Farouk, and four daughters: Princess Fawzia (1921-2013), Princess Faiza (1923-1994), Princess Faika (1923-1986) and Princess Fathia (1930-1976).

Vincent Meylan is an historian and a journalist who has written many books about Jewellery: ‘Boucheron, The Secret Archives’ (2009), ‘Van Cleef & Arpels, Treasures and Legends’ (2012). His latest book, ‘Mellerio dits Meller, Joaillier des Reines’ has just been published in France.

 

Lot 254 – AN ART DECO EMERALD AND DIAMOND SAUTOIR, BY CARTIER

Estimate:  $2,945,458 – $3,979,147

Lot 254 – AN ART DECO EMERALD AND DIAMOND SAUTOIR, BY CARTIER

The detachable stylized shield-shaped diamond pendant decorated with cut-cornered rectangular-cut emeralds, to the similarly-set shield-shaped link chain with pavé-set diamond spacers and graduated diamond-set scroll link backchain enhanced with cabochon emerald collets, mounted in platinum, 1926, necklace 71.5 cm, pendant 8.0 cm

By Cartier London
Accompanied by Certificate of Authenticity no. GE2013-98 dated 14 June 2013 from Cartier Geneva

Also with report no. 69867 dated 23 September 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the 14 emeralds are of Colombian origin, with indications of minor to moderate amount of oil

Pre-Lot Text

The Property of a Princess

Lot Notes

Art Deco Orientalist Sautoir

This sautoir ranks amongst Cartier’s greatest achievements. As fine examples of creations from the Art Deco period become ever more rare, it is fortunate that this necklace of exceptional quality and inspiration has not been remodeled, as so many have been over the time.

The origins of the Art Deco movement can be found in the early years of the 20th Century. In 1906, the well-known Parisian jeweller Louis Cartier encouraged his best designers Baloche, Rauline and Thomas to venture for the first time into abstract and geometric forms. Calibr-cut coloured stones in simple squares, polygons and lozenges made a timid appearance to the detriment of the firm’s “style guirlande”.

The most radical transformation of the period concerned the feminine silhouette. The new woman was liberated from the corset, freed from the long skirts and emancipated from the immense and unwieldy hats. By 1910, the popularity of bodice jewellery had waned as a result of Paul Poiret’s new fashions which eliminated the plunging neckline, the dog collar was considered dated, and the long diamond chain, harbinger of the heavy sautoir of the late 1920s, began its triumphal progress. The jewellers of the time followed suit with the new styles, establishing a productive dialogue with “haute couture”. Due to the strong ties between the two, Cartier exhibited at the haute couture “Pavillon d’Elgance” during the 1925 exhibition instead of at the Grand Palais with the other jewellers.

If the jewellery designers absorbed all of the artistic manifestos which had circulated throughout Europe, they also sought inspiration in far away civilisations. The taste for exoticism and the fascination exercised by the Orient were not recent and came from many sources. As far back as 1853-54, Commodore Matthew Perry led an expedition to Japan, once again encouraging the trade with the far-off country and establishing the taste for ‘Japonisme’. In 1909, Sergei de Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes opened in Paris, the colourful and often Oriental-style costumes for which were avidly followed by fashion and jewellery designers alike. Haute Couture adopted all things Oriental in 1923, after the Chinese Ball at the Paris Opra. The interest in Oriental art offered European artists and designers a new source of stylistic motifs and they adapted, in their own fashion, the decorative elements inspired by various sources: from Moghul flowers to the Arabic decorations. It seemed that the development of magazines and books offered increasing possibilities for the knowledge of artistic expressions different from those of the West.

During the late 1920s and early 1930s, Cartier’s London house overshadowed the Paris firm in the production of large necklaces. Most of them were diamond or coloured stone sautoirs, of which an astonishing number were sold in England, The present sautoir, dated 1926, is one of the great necklaces of the period, demonstrating the incredible quality of the designers of the time, who perfectly combined Oriental inspiration with Western production standards to create such a jewel which after almost 90 years, is still of outstanding modernity.

Sylvie Raulet, ‘Art Deco Jewels’

Hans Nadelhoffer, ‘Cartier Jewelers Extraordinary’

 

Jewels from the Patiño Collection

Lot 213 – AN EXCEPTIONAL DIAMOND RING, BY CHAUMET

Estimate:  $2,334,136 – $2,889,883

Lot 213 – AN EXCEPTIONAL DIAMOND RING, BY CHAUMET
Image credit Denis Hayoun Diode SA Geneva.

Set with a cushion-shaped diamond, weighing approximately 32.65 carats, to the bifurcated shoulders and hoop, ring size 6¼, with French assay marks for platinum and gold

Signed Chaumet Paris
Accompanied by report no. 15310570 dated 12 September 2013 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is F colour, VS2 clarity, and a Diamond Type Classification letter stating that the diamond is Type Ia

Lot Notes

This cushion-shaped diamond was part of a spectacular diamond rivière necklace owned by Mrs Albina Patino. The original collet was detached and added on a hoop by Chaumet.

 

Lot 214 – A MAGNIFICENT EMERALD AND DIAMOND NECKLACE, BY CARTIER

Estimate:  $7,335,857 – $10,448,039

Lot 214 – A MAGNIFICENT EMERALD AND DIAMOND NECKLACE, BY CARTIER
Image credit Denis Hayoun Diode SA Geneva.

Set with twelve octagonal and hexagonal-cut emeralds, weighing a total of approximately 108.74 carats, with twin old European-cut diamond spacers, weighing a total of approximately 59.36 carats, mounted in gold collets with heart-shaped galleries, 1937, modified at a later date to create the pair of earrings en suite (lot 214), 45.0 cm

By Cartier, no. E 6992 A

Accompanied by Premium Report no. 69531 dated 22 August 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the 12 emeralds are of Colombian origin, 8 with indications of minor oil, 4 with no indications of clartiy modification, and an Appendix Letter for an ‘Exceptional Emerald Necklace’ indicating that ‘The described necklace is very impressive in its classic design and contains twelve natural emeralds alternating with colourless diamonds of remarkable size. The emeralds for this necklace have been carefully selected and exhibit an attractive and highly matching green colour combined with a fine purity.’

 

Lot 215 – AN IMPORTANT PAIR OF EMERALD AND DIAMOND EARRINGS

Estimate:  $422,368 – $633,551

Lot 215 – AN IMPORTANT PAIR OF EMERALD AND DIAMOND EARRINGS
Image credit Denis Hayoun Diode SA Geneva.

Set with two octagonal-cut emeralds, weighing approximately 10.01 and 9.36 carats, to the old European-cut diamond surmount and trefoil top, mounted in gold collets with heart-shaped galleries, en suite with lot 215, 3.7 cm
Accompanied by report no. 69530 dated 22 August 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the emeralds are of Colombian origin, with indications of minor amount of oil

Lot Notes

This pair of earrings was created from the necklace (lot 214) in its original form, by taking two of the fourteen emeralds and eight diamonds.

 

A Selection of Jewels from the Collection of Hélène Rochas

Lot 227 – AN AQUAMARINE, KUNZITE AND DIAMOND CHOKER, BY CARTIER

Estimate:  $20,007 – $26,676

Lot 227 – AN AQUAMARINE, KUNZITE AND DIAMOND CHOKER, BY CARTIER

The seven strands of aquamarine faceted beads gathered by a pavé-set diamond ropework clasp centering upon a cushion-shaped kunzite, weighing approximately 61.65 carats, 33.5 cm, with French assay marks for gold and platinum

Signed and with maker’s mark for Cartier, no. R4620

 

Lot 228 – A MYSTERY-SET RUBY AND DIAMOND ‘MAGNOLIA’ BROOCH, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Estimate:  $200,069 – $266,758

Lot 228 – A MYSTERY-SET RUBY AND DIAMOND ‘MAGNOLIA’ BROOCH, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS
Image credit Denis Hayoun Diode SA Geneva.

The mystery-set ruby petals centering upon a brilliant-cut diamond pistil, to the detachable diamond stem and leaves, mounted in platinum, 1968, 10.4 cm, in grey suede Van Cleef & Arpels case

Signed V.C.A on the flowerhead and Van Cleef & Arpels on the stem, no. N.Y.39178

 

Lot 230 – AN AQUAMARINE, PINK TOPAZ AND DIAMOND BANGLE, BY VERDURA

Estimate:  $133,379 – $200,069

Lot 230 – AN AQUAMARINE, PINK TOPAZ AND DIAMOND BANGLE, BY VERDURA
Image credit Denis Hayoun Diode SA Geneva.

The hinged pavé-set diamond torsade band with cushion-shaped aquamarine and pink topaz termimals, weighing respectively 22.91 and 28.17 carats, 1968, inner diameter 5.5 cm

Signed Verdura

 

Lot 231 – THREE SAPPHIRE, RUBY AND DIAMOND ‘HONEYCOMB’ BRACELETS, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Estimate:  $66,690 – $83,362

Lot 231 – THREE SAPPHIRE, RUBY AND DIAMOND ‘HONEYCOMB’ BRACELETS, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Each bracelet designed as a flexible bombé band with honeycomb-shaped scales set with rubies, sapphires or diamonds, 1950s, 20.0 cm each, with French assay mark for gold

By René Boivin (3)

 

Lot 232 – A PERIDOT, CITRINE, MOONSTONE AND GOLD ‘FISH’ PENDANT, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Estimate:  $20,007 – $33,345

Lot 232 – A PERIDOT, CITRINE, MOONSTONE AND GOLD ‘FISH’ PENDANT, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Designed as an articulated sculpted gold fish, the head set with peridot and citrines, the eyes as moonstone cabochons, opening to reveal a scent compartment, suspended from a wirework hoop, circa 1971, 9.0 cm, with French assay mark for gold

By René Boivin

 

Lot 233 – A PAIR OF CULTURED PEARL AND DIAMOND ‘ALGUES’ EAR CLIPS, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Estimate:  $13,338 – $20,007

Lot 233 – A PAIR OF CULTURED PEARL AND DIAMOND ‘ALGUES’ EAR CLIPS, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Each set with a white or grey cultured pearl surmounted by diamond-set leaves, circa 1966, 5.0 cm, with French assay marks for platinum and gold, in brown suede René Boivin pouch

By Boivin

 

Lot 234 – A DIAMOND ‘TRANCHE’ BANGLE, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Estimate:  $111,149 – $166,724

Lot 234 – A DIAMOND ‘TRANCHE’ BANGLE, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Designed as a tapered platinum band decorated with an oval-shaped pavé-set diamond panel, 1930s, inner diameter 5.0 cm, with French assay mark for platinum

With maker’s mark for René Boivin

 

Lot 235 – A DIAMOND, COLOURED DIAMOND, EMERALD AND ENAMEL ‘TIGER’ SHOULDER BROOCH, BY RENÉ BOIVIN

Estimate:  $200,069 – $266,758

Lot 235 – A DIAMOND, COLOURED DIAMOND, EMERALD AND ENAMEL ‘TIGER’ SHOULDER BROOCH, BY RENÉ BOIVIN
Image credit Denis Hayoun Diode SA Geneva.

Designed as a flexible pavé-set diamond crouching tiger with yellow and orange diamond stripes, the eyes as emeralds, with black enamelled strip detail on the head, late 1950s, 11.5 cm, with French assay marks for platinum and gold, in grey suede René Boivin case

Signed René Boivin Paris
Please note that the coloured diamonds have not been tested for natural colour

 

 

Three Jewels by JAR

Lot 212 – AN IMPORTANT EMERALD, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET LEAF BROOCH, BY JAR

Estimate:  $522,402 – $733,586

Lot 212 – AN IMPORTANT EMERALD, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET LEAF BROOCH, BY JAR

Designed as three stylized leaves pavé-set with emeralds, peridots, garnets, citrines and zircons, to the pavé-set diamond scrolling stem and centering upon a cushion-shaped emerald, weighing approximately 11.96 carats, mounted in platinum and gold, 1989, 14.5 cm

Signed JAR Paris

 

Lot 211 – A DIAMOND RING, BY JAR

Estimate:  $422,368 – $633,551

Lot 211 – A DIAMOND RING, BY JAR

Centering upon a collet-set cushion-shaped diamond, weighing approximately 15.50 carats, the base of the gallery enhanced by a silver line of graduated single-cut diamonds, ring size 2¾, with French assay mark for gold, in pink leather JAR case

Signed JAR Paris

 

Lot 210 – A PAIR OF MOONSTONE, QUARTZ AND DIAMOND EAR CLIPS, BY JAR

Estimate:  $44,460 – $66,690

Lot 210 – A PAIR OF MOONSTONE, QUARTZ AND DIAMOND EAR CLIPS, BY JAR

Each centering upon a high dome cabochon rose quartz, weighing approximately 17.32 carats, or moonstone, weighing approximately 15.79 carats, in a pavé-set diamond cage, to the single-cut diamond frame, mounted in silver, gold and platinum, 2001

‘Jewels for Hope: The Collection of Mrs Lily Safra’, Christie’s Geneva, 14 May 2012, Lot 14.

 

 

Lot 252 – A SPECTACULAR SEVEN-STRAND NATURAL PEARL AND DIAMOND NECKLACE

Estimate:  $3,112,182 – $4,668,273

Lot 252 – A SPECTACULAR SEVEN-STRAND NATURAL PEARL AND DIAMOND NECKLACE

The strands composed of seventy-five, seventy-six, eighty-one, eighty-seven, ninety-one, one hundred, and one hundred and four graduated round to button-shaped natural pearls, measuring approximately 17.05 to 5.1 mm, to the old-mine diamond-set bar clasp, shortest row 53.5 cm

Accompanied by report no. 69866 dated 20 September 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the 614 pearls are natural saltwater pearls, and an Appendix letter for an ‘Exceptional Natural Pearl Necklace’ indicating that ‘These pearls exhibit a smooth pearl surface, resulting in a fine and matching pearl luster. Their colour subtly ranges from white to cream, partly with distinct rosé and green overtones. These overtones – poetically also referred to as the ‘Orient of the pearls’ – are an iridescence effect caused on the surface of pearls and contribute greatly to the beauty of these pearls.’

‘The richest merchandise of all, and the most soveraigne

Commoditie throughout the whole world, are these pearles’

Pliny the Elder (23-79AD), Historia naturalis, Lib. IX, c.35

 

Lot 280 – THE UNIQUE SAPPHIRE AND MULTI-GEM ‘CÔTE D’AZUR’ BROOCH, BY ANNA HU

Estimate:  $2,612,010 – $3,667,929

Lot 280 – THE UNIQUE SAPPHIRE AND MULTI-GEM ‘CÔTE D’AZUR’ BROOCH, BY ANNA HU

Centering upon a cushion-shaped sapphire, weighing approximately 58.29 carats, to the pavé-set diamond floral branch decorated with moonstones, coloured sapphires, tsavorites, tourmalines, spinel, coloured diamonds, carved sapphires, carved and drop-shaped emeralds, mounted in gold, 12.7 cm

Signed Anna Hu

Accompanied by report no. 57199 dated 31 August 2010 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the 58.29 carat sapphire is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating, and an additional letter for an ‘Exceptional sapphire’

Report no. 1007583 dated 14 July 2010 from the Gübelin GemLab stating that the 58.29 carat sapphire is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating, and an additional letter for a ‘Remarkable gemstone’

Report no. 1117143074 dated 27 May 2010 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the 58.29 carat sapphire is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating

Lot Notes

Anna Hu grew up studying classical music with a ferocious passion, becoming a nationally celebrated cellist at a very young age. When severe injuries to her shoulder derailed her thriving musical career, she turned to her second love: jewelry. She studied at the Gemological Institute of America (Graduate Gemologist), F.I.T. (jewelry design), Parsons School of Design (Masters in 19th century French Jewelry), and Columbia University (Masters in Arts Administration). After working for various companies and brands including Christie’s New York, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Harry Winston, she founded her namesake brand, Anna Hu Haute Joaillerie, at the age of 30 and opened her first boutique in 2008 in New York.

Anna Hu works exclusively with French-trained artisans in elite workshops between Paris and New York. Her work combines eastern and western influences, often inspired by classical music and nature but she also draws references from Impressionism and Art Nouveau. Anna is as much a scholar as she is an artist and her designs reflect that rarity and sophistication.

Anna presented her first global exhibition at the Louvre’s ‘Les Arts Décoratifs’ in Paris in July 2012 at the age of 35 and celebrated the launch of her first book, ‘Symphony of Jewels, op. 1′ published by The Vendome Press and Thames & Hudson in September 2012.

Anna received ELLE China’s ‘International Jewelry Designer of the Year’ Award in 2012, alongside Christian Louboutin and Viktor & Rolf, and the China Institute’s ‘Artistic Vision’ award in 2011 in New York. Her jewelry has been worn by style-influencers the likes of Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow, Natalie Portman, Scarlett Johansson, Drew Barrymore, Hilary Swank, Oprah Winfrey, the acclaimed contemporary artist Cindy Sherman, and Jetsun Pema, the Queen of Bhutan.

 

Lot 285 – AN ART DECO DIAMOND AND MULTI-GEM ‘TUTTI-FRUTTI’ BRACELET, BY CARTIER

Estimate:  $833,620 – $1,278,218

Lot 285 – AN ART DECO DIAMOND AND MULTI-GEM ‘TUTTI-FRUTTI’ BRACELET, BY CARTIER

The pavé-set diamond branch with carved sapphire and emerald leaves, cabochon sapphire and emerald collets, ruby bead berries and enamel detail, 1930s, 18.0 cm, with French assay mark for platinum, in red leather Cartier case

Signed Cartier, with maker’s mark for Atelier Henri Picq, nos. 02357 and HC 86003

Lot Notes

Few jewels have captured the imagination and enthusiasm of connoisseurs and collectors alike as the tutti-frutti creations by Cartier. These pieces are a direct translation of the colourful enamel seen on the reverse of Indian jewellery, particularly that of Jaipur origin.

Jacques Cartier was to make his first trip to India in 1911. This visit had a profound effect on the jewels produced by the firm throughout the 1920s and 30s and indirectly affected the entire jewellery design field of which the House of Cartier was one of the forerunners. Cartier established a network of buying agents in India, centered in Delhi, Calcutta and Bombay, that enabled them to procure rare Indian stones, including precious gemstones engraved in leaf, blossom and berry shape. The decoration on these stones was based on the Islamic flower cult of the Moghul emperors and inspired Cartier’s designers, Charles Jacqueau in Paris and Georges Grenaille in New York, to create what has become known as the ‘Tutti-frutti’ style: vibrant jewels full of colour and flowing naturalistic design, contrasting with the rather severe, geometric Art Deco style, mainly executed in diamonds.

As very few real ‘Tutti-Frutti’ jewels made their way to the contemporary period, it is a great honor to present one of the finest examples for auction.

 

Lot 275 – AN AMETHYST AND DIAMOND SAUTOIR-BELT

Estimate:  $311,218 – $422,368

Lot 275 – AN AMETHYST AND DIAMOND SAUTOIR-BELT

Composed of thirty-six graduated oval-shaped amethyst collets interspersed with twin rectangular-cut amethysts or twin diamond-set bar links, can be styled as a belt, or detached and worn as three necklaces of varying lengths, mounted in gold, total length 140.0 cm (3)

A set of three Art Deco amethyst and diamond necklaces, each nested necklace designed with oval cut amethyst and diamond buckle intersections mounted in gold and platinum. Formerly property of Gladys Spencer -Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough. Circa 1929
Photo courtesy of FD Gallery

Lot Notes

A year after she died at the age of 97, ‘A Casket of Highly Important Jewels’ that had been the property of Gladys Marie, Dowager Duchess of Marlborough, came to auction at Christie’s on 5 July 1978. This sale reminded everyone of the woman who once had inspired writers like Marcel Proust, who wrote after their first meeting in 1907: ‘I never saw a girl with such beauty, such magnificent intelligence, such goodness and charm.’ Those who knew her in her youth agreed with Proust that she was extraordinary attractive, and for years she was pursued by many of the most eligible bachelors in Europe. But it was not until her fortieth year that she finally married the 9th Duke of Marlborough.

Gladys was born in Paris in 1881, the progeny of two well-established and extremely wealthy American families, the Deacons and the Baldwins. Her parents, Edward and Florence Deacon, were part of the fashionable American set who made their base in Europe and thrived on the high social lifestyle on both side of the Atlantic. Gladys was the eldest of four sisters and grew to be the most beautiful and most intelligent of them all. From her mother she had inherited not only her striking looks but also her deep passion for the arts. Her early years were spent in the company of the best of European and American society and the elite of the artistic world.

The 1978 sale of her casket described lot 80 as an ‘Important Amethyst and Diamond Belt Ornament’. The long chains of amethysts and diamonds were originally part of a sumptuous sautoir first ordered by Gladys in 1926 from Cartier, London. During this period, Cartier was creating wonderful interpretations of this extremely fashionable jewel. The first design of this sautoir was a long chain of oval amethysts connected by links of baton-shaped amethysts and diamonds, and the clasp was designed as an open circle set with calibré-cut turquoises and diamonds, connected by an amethyst-set fob attachment. From Cartier’s records, it is clear that the Marlboroughs supplied the 34 larger amethysts and four diamonds, previously set in a brooch. The turquoises and the baton-shaped amethysts, together with a further nearly 20 carats of diamonds were supplied by Cartier. The clasp of this sautoir, was sold as a brooch. In 1928, Gladys had the sautoir altered yet again so it could be worn as a two row necklace together with detachable diamond panels.

Although modified several times through the years, this versatile sautoir is still today set with the magnificent amethysts of the Duchess of Marlborough.

Text from the book ‘Famous Jewelry Collectors, Thames & Hudson, 1999. Courtesy of Mr Stefano Papi.

 

Lot 206 – AN EXCEPTIONAL RUBY AND COLOURED DIAMOND RING

Estimate:  $1,667,240 – $2,778,734

Lot 206 – AN EXCEPTIONAL RUBY AND COLOURED DIAMOND RING

Set with an oval-shaped ruby, weighing approximately 5.09 carats, to the pink diamond surround, mounted in platinum and gold, ring size 6
Accompanied by report no. 0706542 dated 29 June 2007 from the Gübelin GemLab stating that the ruby is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating, and that the ‘colour variety of the ruby may also be called “pigeon’s blood red”‘, an Appendix indicating that ‘Such a combination of characteristics is rare in natural rubies of this size’, and a Note on ‘Large rubies of top gem-quality’.

Report no. 69836 dated 19 September 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the ruby is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating and that ‘the colour of this ruby may also be called pigeon blood red’, also with an Appendix Letter indicating that ‘Its vivid and saturated colour, poetically referred to as ‘pigeon blood’ red, is due to a combination of well-balanced trace elements in this gemstone, characteristic for the finest rubies from Mogok’.

Please note that the coloured diamonds have not been tested for natural colour

 

Lot 265 – A PAIR OF NATURAL PEARL AND DIAMOND EAR PENDANTS

Estimate:  $833,620 – $1,055,919

Lot 265 – A PAIR OF NATURAL PEARL AND DIAMOND EAR PENDANTS

Each greyish white natural drop-shaped pearl, measuring approximately 13.7-14.8 x 19.1 mm and 13.8-14.5 x 19.0 mm, with a square and baguette-cut diamond surmount, to the baguette and brilliant-cut diamond openwork scroll top, late 1960s, mounted in platinum and gold, 6.0 cm
Accompanied by report no. 59112 dated 29 March 2011 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the pearls are natural saltwater pearls

 

Lot 208 – AN ART DECO EMERALD AND DIAMOND BRACELET, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Estimate:  $733,586 – $1,044,804

Lot 208 – AN ART DECO EMERALD AND DIAMOND BRACELET, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

The six graduated octagonal-cut emeralds alternated with six cut-cornered rectangular-cut diamonds, each flanked with square- and tapered baguette-cut diamond spacers, circa 1925, 17.5 cm, with French assay marks for platinum and gold, in blue leather Van Cleef & Arpels case

Signed Van Cleef & Arpels Paris, no. 23785
Accompanied by report no. 69191 dated 19 July 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the 6 emeralds are of Colombian origin, 5 with indications of minor amount of oil and 1 with indications of moderate amount of oil

 

Lot 271 – AN IMPORTANT SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND RING, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Estimate:  $678,011 – $789,160

Lot 271 – AN IMPORTANT SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND RING, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Set with an oval-shaped sapphire, weighing approximately 23.49 carats, to the pear-shaped diamond shoulders, mounted in platinum and gold, 1981, ring size 6½

Signed Van Cleef & Arpels, no. 127 732
Accompanied by report no. 13025090 dated 18 February 2013 from the Gübelin GemLab stating that the sapphire is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating, that ‘This colour variety of sapphire may also be called “Royal Blue”, and with an Information sheet on unheated sapphires

Report no. 66579 dated 29 January 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the sapphire is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating

Certificate of Authenticity dated 9 January 2013 from Van Cleef & Arpels

 

Lot 253 – A SET OF ANTIQUE NATURAL PEARL AND DIAMOND JEWELLERY

Estimate:  $422,368 – $633,551

Lot 253 – A SET OF ANTIQUE NATURAL PEARL AND DIAMOND JEWELLERY

Comprising a brooch of ‘girandolle’ design, set with a natural grey baroque pearl in an old-cut diamond surround, to the three detachable pendants similarly-set with natural grey and brown pearls, a pair of natural brown pearl and diamond ‘dormeuse’ earrings en suite, mounted in gold, mid-19th Century, brooch 6.5 cm, earrings 2.7 cm
Accompanied by report no. 69835 dated 19 September 2013 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the 7 pearls are saltwater natural pearls, with no indications of artificial colour modification (2)

FORMERLY THE PROPERTY OF COUNTESS MARIA PUSLOWSKA

 

Lot 240 – A SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND RING, BY MOUAWAD

Estimate:  $522,402 – $733-586

Lot 240 – A SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND RING, BY MOUAWAD

Set with a cut-cornered rectangular-cut sapphire, weighing approximately 20.70 carats, to the shield-shaped diamond shoulders, weighing approximately 1.01 and 0.83 carat, mounted in gold, ring size 6

Signed Mouawad

Accompanied by report no. 63477 dated 29 May 2012 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the sapphire is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating, and an Appendix indicating that the sapphire’s ‘vivid blue colour is due to a combination of well-balanced trace elements in the gemstones, typical and characteristic for the finest sapphires of Mogok, Burma.’

Report no.1116022 dated 3 December 2011 from the Gübelin GemLab stating that the sapphire is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating

Report no. 1147816695 dated 20 March 2013 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the 1.01 carat diamond is E colour, VS1 clarity

Diamond dossier no. 6142818448 dated 20 March 2013 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the 0.83 carat diamond is D colour, VVS2 clarity

 

Lot 243 – A PAIR OF EMERALD AND DIAMOND EAR CLIPS, BY BULGARI

Estimate:  $477,942 – $577,977

Lot 243 – A PAIR OF EMERALD AND DIAMOND EAR CLIPS, BY BULGARI

Each centering upon a cut-cornered rectangular-cut emerald, weighing approximately 13.64 and 13.42 carats, to the baguette-cut diamond petal and pavé-set diamond surround, mounted in gold

Signed Bulgari
Accompanied by report no. CS 56413 A and B dated 12 August 2013 from the AGL American Gemological Laboratories stating that the 2 emeralds are of Colombian origin, with indications of insignificant to minor traditional clarity enhancement (oil)

Report no. 13048090 dated 27 April 2013 from the Gübelin GemLab stating that the 13.64 carat emerald is of Colombian origin, with indications of minor clarity enhancement

Report no. 13048089 dated 27 April 2013 from the Gübelin GemLab stating that the 13.42 carat emerald is of Colombian origin, with indications of minor clarity enhancement

 

Lot 169 – A SET OF ANTIQUE RUBY AND DIAMOND JEWELLERY

Estimate:  $444,597 – $666,896

Lot 169 – A SET OF ANTIQUE RUBY AND DIAMOND JEWELLERY

The necklace composed of eighteen graduated diamond clusters, each centering upon an oval or cushion-shaped ruby, interspersed by diamond collets, suspending at the front a detachable pendant with two similarly-set clusters, a pair of ear clips en suite, mounted in silver and gold, with three additional brooch fittings, late 19th Century, 40.5 cm
Accompanied by report no. 64303 dated 20 July 2012 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that 20 rubies are of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating, and that 2 rubies are of Siam (Thailand) origin, with indications of heating (5)

 

Lot 185 – A PAIR OF DIAMOND EAR CLIPS, BY HARRY WINSTON, WITH NATURAL PEARL PENDANTS

Estimate:  $733,586 – 4944,769

Lot 185 – A PAIR OF DIAMOND EAR CLIPS, BY HARRY WINSTON, WITH NATURAL PEARL PENDANTS

Each top designed as a cluster of marquise and pear-shaped diamonds, weighing approximately 26.87 carats

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